Sunday, April 28, 2013

FIRST LOOK Inside the FEDERAL RESERVE: USD, CASH, GOLD and Monetary System

Gold vs FIAT EMPIRE - Why the Federal Reserve Violates the U.S. Constitution

"Some of these movies and posts are all history already, but recent events in the Gold Markets are only proving that the whole FED based financial system is rigged and there will be only one way out - ultimate currency, which is Gold."

"The Illuminati Were Amateurs" - Matt Taibbi Explains How "Everything Is Rigged" From LIBOR to Gold Markets

 "Matt Taibbi continues his investigative journalism at its best - will his longly voice in the mainstream media be heard one day finally? With the recent Crash in Paper Gold market this new information clearly points out that Gold Shorts under the JP Morgan's management are in a Big Trouble Now."  

Who Owns The Federal Reserve?

"FIRST LOOK Inside the FEDERAL RESERVE, USD, CASH, GOLD monetary SYSTEM - Americas Money Vault, National Geographic 

For the first time, National Geographic takes you inside the heart of the money machine to places that you're not allowed to bring a camera ...straight into the vaults of some of the world's largest stashes of what you want, need and bust your butt to get: Money.

Hidden deep under the streets of New York City, hundreds of billion dollars in gold bars are tucked away in a bunker that is anchored to the bedrock of Manhattan Island itself.

In the latest in a string of high-profile hacking disclosures, the Federal Reserve confirmed on Wednesday that one of its websites was broken into by cyber hackers in a breach that reportedly leaked the contact information of thousands of bankers.

While the central bank said the incident didn't "affect critical operations" of the Federal Reserve System, the disclosure is sure to fuel concerns about the cyber security of government websites and critical financial infrastructure.

The Fed hack appears to be tied to an Anonymous group that published on Twitter the credentials of more than 4,000 commercial bankers early Monday morning. The group, Operation Last Resort, said it received the documents "via the FED."

Call it the Rick Perry gold rush: The governor wants to bring the state's gold reserves back from a New York vault to Texas.

And he may have legislative support to do it. Freshman Rep. Giovanni Capriglione, R-Southlake, is carrying a bill that would establish the Texas Bullion Depository, a secure state-based bank to house $1 billion worth of gold bars owned by the University of Texas Investment Management Co., or UTIMCO, and stored by the Federal Reserve.

"If you think gold is a hedge, or a protection, you always want it as close to the individual and the entity as possible," Paul told The Texas Tribune on Thursday. "Texas is better served if it knows exactly where the gold is rather than depending on the security of the Federal Reserve."

Sadly, most Americans don't even realize that a private banking cartel has a monopoly over all money creation in this country. In recent years they have abused this power by wildly printing money ("quantitative easing"), and by making more than 16 trillion dollars in secret loans to their friends during the last financial crisis. "Neither the Treasury Department nor the Federal Reserve believes that the law can or should be used to facilitate the production of platinum coins for the purpose of avoiding an increase in the debt limit"
remaining alternative to Congress raising the nation's borrowing limit, which would utilize a loophole in federal law to mint a $1 trillion coin to be deposited in the Federal Reserve and ensure the federal government could pay all bills and debt obligations.

You can thank the reckless money printing that the Federal Reserve has been doing for the incredible bull market that we have seen in recent months. When the Federal Reserve does more "quantitative easing", it is the financial markets that benefit the most. The Dow and the S&P 500 have both hit levels not seen since 2007 this month, and many analysts are projecting that 2013 will be a banner year for stocks. But is a rising stock market really a sign that the overall economy is rapidly improving as many are suggesting? Of course not. Just because the Federal Reserve has inflated another false stock market bubble Barack Obama has been president, 40 percent of all American workers are making $20,000 a year or less, median household income has declined for four years in a row, and poverty in the United States is absolutely exploding. So quantitative easing has definitely not made things better for the middle class. But all of the money printing that the Fed has been doing has worked out wonderfully for Wall Street. Profits are soaring at Goldman Sachs and luxury estates in the Hamptons are selling briskly. Unfortunately, this is how things work in America these days. Our "leaders" seem far more concerned with the welfare of Wall Street than they do about the welfare of the American people. When things get rocky, their first priority always seems to be to do whatever it takes to pump up the financial markets Luxetti"

Special Op: Gold Wash Out. China Takes Another Stab At The Dollar, Anonymous Takes On The FED

"We all can have the different views on Anonymous, but timing of all recent events is pointing out to the very serious financial situation underlying the so apparent manipulation in the Gold market these days. If it takes Years for Germany to bring its Gold back - how much Gold Is There If Any Left?
  And here we go with another twist to the Friday's Gold Wash Out Special Op - ZeroHedge reports on another direct currency swap line established by China with France. This is just getting more serious day by day - US Dollar is under threat as the Reserve Currency of Choice, which is No More Wanted. The question is: will other Central banks join the FED in order to Kill the Confidence in Gold to protect the US Dollar Status now?"

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Lithium Drive: Tesla Model S Set to Beat Chevy Volt and Nissan Leaf in Q1 Sales

   Tesla Model S is winning the hearts of wealthy consumers now, next generation will bring the Electric Cars to masses.

Powered by LIthium: Tesla Model X revealed at the 2013 Detroit Auto Show

Next Step is Tesla Generation III: Bringing EVs to the Mass Market.

Tesla Model S Set to Beat Chevy Volt and Nissan Leaf in Q1 Sales

You might not think it at first, given the not-so-insignificant price difference between the vehicles, but Tesla Motors' Model S luxury sedan is allegedly set to best its rivals, the Chevrolet Volt and Nissan Leaf, in first-quarter vehicle sales for the first time in the company's history.
According to a new report from Bloomberg, Tesla is allegedly preparing to announce at least 4,750 sales of its Model S — with a base price of an eye-opening $69,000 — for the first quarter of the fiscal year. If so, that puts the company ahead of the 4,421 Chevy Volts and 3,695 Nissan Leafs sold within a similar time frame.
To put the vehicles into perspective financially, the Volt starts at a base price of $39,900 and the Leaf starts at $28,000 – recently dropped as of January of this year, and now quite less than half the base price of the aforementioned Tesla Model S.
Tesla's projections come on the wake of its previous announcement that the company is expecting its first-ever quarterly profit for this first quarter, thanks to strong sales of the Model S. Unfortunately, those looking to score a cheaper version of Tesla's electric vehicle were also hit with a bit of news during Tesla's financial tease. At that time, Tesla also indicated that was dropping its lower-cost version of the Model S — the variant of the car that came with a 40 kWh battery capable of a mere 160 miles of driving range.
To Tesla's credit, roughly four percent of all Model S purchases were for this lowest-end iteration of its electric cars. Those who had previously purchased a since-cancelled 40-kWh Model S were all given upgrades to the 60-kWh version of the vehicle with one key caveat: The range and battery output have been limited, via software, to give the vehicle the same capabilities as the 40-kWh Model S. Those who want to "unlock" their cars to their fullest potential have to pony up an additional $10,000 – the difference between the 40-kWh and 60-kWh versions of the cars.
However, there's a silver lining to the "upgrade." By using the 60-kWh battery, previous 40-kWh buyers – though limited – are at least able to tap into the Tesla Supercharger network that the 40-kWh versions of the car couldn't actually access. Said Supercharger stations, sprinkled around the country, allow Tesla drivers to charge up their batteries to half after around 30 minutes of sitting around and connecting up to the 90-kW charging station.
Tesla recently announced that it has expanded its battery warranty program to cover virtually anything that happens to the all-so-important heart of its vehicles, save for any kind of malicious abuse of the battery like "blowing it up" or "using it for target practice," to slightly paraphrase Tesla CEO Elon Musk.
Additionally, Tesla will also begin to offer top-of-the-line Model S "loaner" cars for those whose Tesla vehicles need servicing. Tesla itself will pick up the to-be-looked-at vehicle and drop off an 85-KwH Model S or Tesla Roadster for the customer to use as long as he or she needs to – and the loaner cars will be offered for sale, should a person end up wanting to hold onto their rental for a wee bit longer."

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Peak oil isn’t dead: An interview with Chris Nelder

The Washington Post:

Peak oil isn’t dead: An interview with Chris Nelder

"Warnings about “peak oil” have been with us since the OPEC crisis in the 1970s. At some point, the experts said, the world would hit a limit on how much oil could be extracted from the ground. Production would then drop, prices would soar, chaos would ensue.
But after a worrisome series of price spikes starting in 2007, oil triumphalism is once again ascendant. Companies are now using new technologies to extract crude from hard-to-reach sources, from the tar sands of Alberta to shale formations in North Dakota. After decades of decline, U.S. oil production has risen to its highest levels since the 1990s. And that’s led many analysts and journaliststo confidently declare that “peak oil is dead.”
Not everyone’s convinced, however, that oil is really on the verge of a new boom. Energy analyst Chris Nelder, for one, has spent a lot of time scrutinizing the claims of the oil triumphalists. Our newfound oil resources, he argues, aren’t nearly as promising as they first appear. And peak oil is still as relevant as ever.
I talked to Nelder by phone this week. A lightly edited transcript follows."

Oil Smoke and Mirrors

 "Shale Oil will save us all? Peak Oil  is the forbidden subject now - millions were spent on mass media just to bring the false security, but it is out there and we have only a very small time gap before it."
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Saturday, April 27, 2013

Oil Smoke and Mirrors


  Shale Oil will save us all? Peak Oil  is the forbidden subject now - millions were spent on mass media just to bring the false security, but it is out there and we have only a very small time gap before it.

Chris Martenson: Peak Oil - The Really, Really Big Picture


  Chris Martenson puts all the noise about the newly found Holly Grail of Fracking into perspective and, as you can guess, we are still all ... (add spice to your liking here).

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Gold vs FIAT EMPIRE - Why the Federal Reserve Violates the U.S. Constitution


  Some of these movies and posts are all history already, but recent events in the Gold Markets are only proving that the whole FED based financial system is rigged and there will be only one way out - ultimate currency, which is Gold.

"The Illuminati Were Amateurs" - Matt Taibbi Explains How "Everything Is Rigged" From LIBOR to Gold Markets

 "Matt Taibbi continues his investigative journalism at its best - will his longly voice in the mainstream media be heard one day finally? With the recent Crash in Paper Gold market this new information clearly points out that Gold Shorts under the JP Morgan's management are in a Big Trouble Now."  

The History Of Money And Why US Dollars Are Issued By Private Bank - Federal Reserve System

  "We are at the very important point in the history of the modern financial system. The recent events in Europe  are no less than ground-changing historical  development and the magnitude of it will be understood only many years later. European countries are giving up their Sovereignty in order to save the Euro zone. Now the history of money will be your guide to the new order, when the New Normal will be transformed into the New World Order. 
  Private FED manipulates all markets now and has the right at its own discretion to increase the FED rate at any moment, which will increase all interest rates in a chain: mortgage payments, car loans, student loans, credit card loans, business loans etc. Should FED decide to stop monetary expansion at some point: QEn+1 and Twists - yields on the Treasuries will explode. U.S. is at the total mercy of the unelected managers running the private bank. You would think: who can do such a thing, which will bring a total collapse to the world economy - watch the movies to get your own answer. The idea to buy the assets for pennies on the dollar can be irresistible again."

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Physical gold vs paper gold: waiting for the dam to break

 We continue our research into the ground breaking events behind the unprecedented panic among Gold Shorts these days.

"The Illuminati Were Amateurs" - Matt Taibbi Explains How "Everything Is Rigged" From LIBOR to Gold Markets

 "Matt Taibbi continues his investigative journalism at its best - will his longly voice in the mainstream media be heard one day finally? With the recent Crash in Paper Gold market this new information clearly points out that Gold Shorts under the JP Morgan's management are in a Big Trouble Now."  


Physical gold vs paper gold: waiting for the dam to break


Dynamite on dollar notes Introduction

In this article I will argue that the recent slide in the gold price has generated substantial demand for bullion that will likely bring forward a financial and systemic disaster for both central and bullion banks that has been brewing for a long time. To understand why, we must examine their role and motivations in precious metals markets and assess current ownership of physical gold, while putting investor emotion into its proper context.
In the West (by which in this article I broadly mean North America and Europe) the financial community treats gold as an investment. However, of the global pool of gold, which GoldMoney estimates to be about 160,000 tonnes, the amount actually held by western investors in portfolios is a very small fraction of this amount. Furthermore investor behaviour, which in itself accounts for just part of the West’s bullion demand, is sharply at odds with the hoarders’ objectives, which is behind underlying tensions in bullion markets. To compound the problem, analysts, whose focus incorporates portfolio investment theories and assumptions, have very little understanding of the economic case for precious metals, being schooled in modern neo-classical economic theories.
These economic theories, coupled with modern investment analysis when applied to bullion pricing, have failed to understand the growing human desire for protection from monetary instability. The result has for a considerable time been the suppression of bullion prices in capital markets below their natural level of balance set by supply and demand. Furthermore, the value put on precious metals by hoarders in the West has been less than the value to hoarders in other countries, particularly the growing numbers of savers in Asia.
These tensions, if they persist, are bound to contribute to the eventual destruction of paper currencies.

The ownership of gold

The amount of gold bullion that backs investor-driven markets is not statistically recorded, but we can illustrate its significance relative to total stocks by referring back to the time of the oil crisis of the mid-1970s. In 1974 the global stock of gold was estimated to be half that of today, at about 80,000 tonnes. Monetary gold was about 37,000 tonnes, leaving 43,000 tonnes in the form of non-monetary bullion, coins and jewellery. Let us arbitrarily assume, on the basis of global wealth distribution, that two thirds of this was held by the minority population in the West, amounting to about 30,000 tonnes.
This figure probably grew somewhat before the early 1980s, spurred by the bull market and growing fear of inflation, which saw investors buy mainly coins and mining shares. Demand for gold bars was driven by the rapid accumulation of dollars in the oil-exporting nations, as well as some hoarding by wealthy investors from all over the world through Switzerland and London.
The sharp rise in global interest rates in the Volcker era, the subsequent decline of the inflation threat and the resulting bear market for gold inevitably led to a reduction of bullion holdings by wealthy investors in the West. Swiss and other private banks, employing a new generation of fund managers and investment advisors trained in modern portfolio theories, started selling their customers’ bullion positions in the 1980s, leaving very little by 2000. In the latter stages of the bear market, jewellery sales in the West became a replacement source of bullion supply, but this was insufficient to compensate for massive portfolio liquidation.
So by the year 2000, Western ownership of non-monetary gold suffered the severe attrition of a twenty-year bear market and the reduction of inflation expectations. Portfolios, which routinely had 10-15% exposure to gold 40 years ago even today have virtually no exposure at all. Given that jewellery consumption in Europe and North America was only 400-750 tonnes per annum over the period, by the year 2000 overall gold ownership in the West must have declined significantly from the 1974 guesstimate of 30,000 tonnes. While the total gold stock in 2000 stood at 128,000 tonnes, the virtual elimination of portfolio holdings will have left Western holders with little more than perhaps an accumulation of jewellery, coins and not much else: bar ownership would have been at a very low ebb.
Since 2000, demand from countries such as India and more recently China is known to have increased sharply, supporting the thesis that gold has continued to accumulate at an accelerating pace in non-Western hands.
Western bullion markets have therefore been on the edge of a physical stock crisis for some time. Much of the West’s physical gold ownership since 2000 has been satisfied by recycling scrap originating in the West, suggesting that total gold ownership in the West today barely rose before the banking crisis despite a tripling of prices. Meanwhile the disparity between demand for gold in the West compared with the rest of the world has continued, while the West’s investment management community has been actively discouraging investment.
The result has been that nearly all new mine production and Western central bank supply has been absorbed by non-Western hoarders and their central banks. While post-banking crisis there has presumably been a pick-up in Western hoarding, as evidenced by ETF and coin sales and some institutional involvement, it is dwarfed by demand from other countries. So it is reasonable to conclude that of the total stock of non-monetary gold, very little of it is left in Western hands. And so long as the pressure for migration out of the West’s ownership continues, there will come a point where there is so little gold left that futures and forwards markets cease to operate effectively. That point might have actually arrived, signalled by attempts to smash the price this month.
This admittedly broad-brush assessment has important implications for the price stability essential to bullion banks operating in paper markets as well as for central banks attempting to maintain confidence in their paper currencies.

Precious metals in capital markets

In the West itself, the attitudes of the investment community are fundamentally different from even those of the majority of Western hoarders, who are looking for protection from systemic and currency risks as opposed to investment returns. Western investors are generally oblivious to the implications, the most fundamental of which is that falling prices actually stimulate physical demand. Before the recent dramatic slide in prices the investment community undervalued precious metals compared with Western hoarders, let alone those in Asia, encouraging physical bullion to migrate from financial markets both to firmer hands in the West as well as the bulk of it to non-West ownership. There is now irrefutable evidence that these flows have accelerated significantly on lower prices in recent weeks, as rational price theory would lead one to expect.
Pricing bullion is therefore not as simple as the investment community generally believes. It is being put about, mostly on grounds of technical analysis, that the bull markets in gold and silver have ended, and precious metals have entered a new downtrend. The evidence cited is that medium and longer-term moving averages have been violated and are now falling; furthermore important support levels have been breached.
These developments, which arise out of the futures and forward markets, have rattled Western investors who thought they were in for an easy ride. However, a close examination of futures trading shows the bearish case even on investment grounds is flawed, as the following two charts of official statistics provided by weakly Commitment of Traders data clearly show.
Money managers - gold
Money managers - silver

The Money Managers category is the clearest reflection in the official data of investor portfolio positions, representing sizeable mutual and hedge funds. In both cases, the number of long contracts is at historically low levels, and shorts, arguably the better reflection of money-manager sentiment, remain close to high extremes. On this basis, investor sentiment is clearly very bearish already, with the investment management community already committed to falling prices. Put very simplistically there are now more buyers than sellers.
Money Managers are in stark opposition to the Commercials, who seek to transfer entrepreneurial risk to Money Managers and other investor and speculator categories. The official statistics break Commercials down into two categories: Producer/Merchant/Processor/User, and Swap Dealers. Both categories include the activities of bullion banks, which in practice supply liquidity to the market. Because investors and speculators tend to run bull positions, bullion banks acting as market-makers will in aggregate always be short. A successful bullion bank trader will seek to make trading profits large enough to compensate for any losses on his net short position that arise from rising prices.
A bullion bank trader must avoid carrying large short positions if in his judgement prices are likely to rise. He will be more relaxed about maintaining a bear position in falling markets. Crucially, he must keep these opinions private, and the release of market statistics are designed to accommodate these dealers’ need for secrecy.
Bullion banks’ position details are disclosed at the beginning of every month in the Bank Participation Reports, again official statistics. They are broken down into two categories, based on the individual bank’s self-description on the CFTC’s Form 40, into US and Non-US Banks. Their positions are shown in the next two charts (note the time scale is monthly).
Gold - bank net shorts
Silver - bank net shorts

In both gold and silver, the bullion banks have managed to reduce their exposure from extreme net short over the last four months. The reduction of their market exposure suggests that they have been deliberately transferring this risk to other parties, and is consistent with an anticipation that bullion prices will rise. It is the other side of the high level of bearishness reflected in the Money Manager category shown in the first two charts. The bullion banks control the market; the Money Managers are merely tools of their trade.
There has been little reduction in open interest in gold and it has remained strong in silver, because risk has been transferred rather than extinguished. Daily official statistics on open interest are provided by the exchange and summarised in the next two charts (note that data is daily).
Gold - open interest
Silver - open interest

From these charts it can be seen that recent declines in the gold price are failing to reduce open interest further, and in silver open interest remains stubbornly high. Therefore, attempts by bullion banks to reduce their net short exposure by marking prices down are showing signs of failure.
We can therefore conclude that investor sentiment is at bearish extremes and the bullion banks have reduced their net short exposure to levels where it risks rising again. Therefore the downside for precious metals prices appears to be severely limited, contrary to sentiments expressed by technical analysts and in the media.
This market position is against a background of a growing shortage of physical bullion, which is our next topic.

Physical markets

Casual observers of precious metal prices are generally unaware that the headline writers focus on activity in the futures markets and generally ignore developments in physical bullion. This is consistent with the fact that market data is available in the former, while dealing in the latter is secretive. However, as with icebergs, it is not what you see above the water that matters so much as that which is out of sight below.
It is not often understood in investment circles that gold and silver are commodities for which the laws of supply and demand are not overridden by investor psychology. Therefore, if the price falls, demand increases. Indeed, the increase in demand has far outweighed selling by nervous investors; even before the price-drop, demand for both silver and gold significantly exceeded supply. Evidence ranges from readily available statistics on record demand for newly-minted gold and silver coins and the net accumulation of gold by non-Western central banks, to trade-based information such as imports and exports of non-monetary gold as well as reports from trade associations reporting demand in diverse countries such as India, China, the UK, US, Japan and even Australia.
All this evidence points in the same direction: that physical demand is increasing on every price drop. There is therefore a growing pricing conflict between futures and forward markets, which do not generally involve settlement but the rolling-over of speculative positions, and of the underlying physical metal. Furthermore, analysts make the mistake of looking at gold purely in terms of mining and scrap supply, when nearly all gold ever mined is theoretically available to the market, in the right conditions and at the right price. The other side of this larger coin is that if the price of gold is suppressed by activity in paper markets to below what it would otherwise be, the stimulus for physical demand, being based on a 160,000 tonne market, is likely to be considerably greater on a given price drop than analysts who are myopic beyond 2,750 tonnes of annual mine production might expect. The numbers that are available confirm this to have been the case, particularly over the last few weeks, with reports from all over the world of an unprecedented surge in demand.
This is at the root of a developing crisis of which few commentators are as yet aware. Demand for physical has accelerated the transfer of bullion from capital markets to hoarders everywhere and from the West’s capital markets to other countries, which has been the trend since the oil crisis in the mid-Seventies. This is what’s behind an acute shortage of physical gold in capital markets, explaining perhaps why bullion banks feel the need to reduce their short positions.
While we can detail their exposure in futures markets, meaningful statistics are not available in over-the-counter forward markets, particularly for London, which dominates this form of trading. Forwards are considerably more flexible than futures as a trading medium, generating trading profits, commissions, fees and collateralised banking business. The ability to run unallocated client accounts, whereby a client’s gold is taken onto a bank’s balance sheet, is in stable market conditions an extremely profitable activity, made more profitable by high operational gearing. The result is that paper forward positions are many multiples of the physical bullion available. The extent of this relationship between physical bullion and paper is not recorded, but judging by the daily turnover in London there is an enormous synthetic short physical position. For this reason a sharply rising price would be catastrophic and any drain on bullion supplies rapidly escalates the risk.
Overseeing this market is the Bank of England co-operating with other Western central banks and the Bank for International Settlements, whose combined interest obviously favours price stability. They have been quick to supply the market if needed, confirmed by freely-admitted leasing operations in the past, and by secretive supply into the market, which has been detected by independent supply and demand analysis over the last 15 years. Furthermore, as currency-issuing banks, central banks are unlikely to take kindly to market signals that suggest gold is a better store of value than their own paper money.
We can only speculate about day-to-day interventions by Western central banks in gold markets. In this regard it seems that the slide in prices on the 12th and 15th April was triggered by a very large seller of paper gold; if this market story and the amount mentioned are correct, it can only be central bank intervention, acting to deliberately drive prices lower. Given the market position, with Money Managers in the futures markets already short and highly vulnerable to a bear squeeze, the story seems credible. The objective would be to persuade holders of physical ETFs and allocated gold accounts to sell and supply the market, on the assumption that they would behave as investors convinced the bull market is over.


For the last 40 years gold bullion ownership has been migrating from West to elsewhere, mostly the Middle East and Asia, where it is more valued. The buyers are not investors, but hoarders less complacent about the future for paper currencies than the West’s banking and investment community. There was a shortage of physical metal in the major centres before the recent price fall, which has only become more acute, fully absorbing ETF and other liquidation, which is small in comparison to the demand created by lower prices. If the fall was engineered with the collusion of central banks it has backfired spectacularly.
The time when central banks will be unable to continue to manage bullion markets by intervention has probably been brought closer. They will face having to rescue the bullion banks from the crisis of rising gold and silver prices by other means, if only to maintain confidence in paper currencies. Any gold held by struggling eurozone nations, theoretically available to supply markets as a stop-gap, will not last long and may have been already sold.
This will likely develop into another financial crisis at the worst possible moment, when central banks are already being forced to flood markets with paper currency to keep interest rates down, banks solvent, and to finance governments’ day-to-day spending. Its importance is that it threatens more than any other of the various crises to destabilise confidence in government-backed currencies, bringing an early end to all attempts to manage the others systemic problems.
History might judge April 2013 as the month when through precipitate action in bullion markets Western central banks and the banking community finally began to lose control over all financial markets.
Author: "

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